Book ☆ In the Bazaar of Love Ê 224 pages ´ Amir khusrau

Book ¶ In the Bazaar of Love Î Amir Khusrau

In the Bazaar of LoveI vow to diethat you might look my waySee how many have died like me in the bazaar of loveAmir Khusrau poet courtier mystic musician straddled the worlds of politics and religion and helped forge a distinctive synthesis of Muslim and Hindu cultures His poetry in Persian appealed eually to the Delhi sultans and to his Sufi sheikh Nizamuddin Auliya It was appreciated not only in India where his Hindavi poetry has survived through a lively oral tradition but also across a cosmopolitan Persianate world that stretched from Turkey to Bengal Khusrau's poetry has thrived for cent You are the meaning behind every form You drive my ruined heart and soul insaneLove how did you come to workon a nobody like me? Is no one elseleft in this ruined world? Not having dreamt bitter dreamsa single night how can they knowthe taste of aching absence?The times suffer a drought of faithfulnessand storms well up in the eyesWhen will the stars decree this omen of rain? At night I bewail the insomnia of absenceThis is my cordial song Yearning for you no trace of me remains Today the breeze picked up the smellof my heart and spleen Careful be sure it’s notallowed to blow his way When evening falls my heart catchesfire in solitude

Amir Khusrau Î In the Bazaar of Love Book

Uries and continues to be read and recited to this day But despite his vast literary output there is a dearth of translations of his work In the Bazaar of Love offers new translations of Khusrau's poems in Persian and Hindavi many of which are being translated into English for the first time Paul Losensky's translations of Khusrau's ghazals including his mystical and romantic poems comprise fresh renditions of old favourites while also bringing to light several little known works Sunil Sharma brings us many of Khusrau's short poems including those belonging to the awwali Amir khusro good translation badWhen i first checked the goodreads page and saw so many people talking about how a bad translation this was i first laughed and shrugged it off thinking normies can't even appreciate simple artBut after reading it myself omg i agreeEffin horrible translation Most of poems and ghazals don't even rhyme a little or have any rhythm in the original language it's all about rhythmIt's like the only English translation available tho so sed lyf ig Beggars can't be choosers i hope translations come out Indians would've translated it a lot of times already but amir khusro and most other muslim poets of those times wrote in Persian Farsi so idk if my Persian bros are gonna do it or notMaybe oneday new translations and editions would come out who knows But for now it was kinda nice too I especially liked the stories near the ending Wish it included the whole poems of farhad and sherin too sed lyf Noice book tho 👌🏼 I vow to diethat you might look my waySee how many have died like mein the bazaar of love uwu           

Ebook In the Bazaar of Love

Book ☆ In the Bazaar of Love Ê 224 pages ´ Amir khusrau ´ [Reading] ➿ In the Bazaar of Love By Amir Khusrau – Gym-apparel.co.uk I vow to diethat you might look my waySee how many have died like me in the bazaar of loveAmir Khusrau—poet courtier mystic musician—straddled the worlds of pRepertoire as well as a mixed prose and verse narration 'The Romance of Duval Rani and Khizr Khan'The first comprehensive selection of Amir Khusrau’s poetry In the Bazaar of Love covers a wide range of genre and forms evoking the magic of one of the best loved poets of the Indian subcontinentAbout the AuthorPaul Losensky is associate professor at Indiana University Bloomington where he teaches translation studies and Persian language and literatureSunil Sharma teaches Persian and Indian literatures at Boston University He is the author of two books on Indo Persian poetr Poetry is difficult to translate but translations between languages that share no common cultural roots is even difficult so when the originals follow a highly formal set of rules and metrical systems that are simply impossible to translate without taking liberties with the original in which case the final product looks like a rendition or an adaption than a translation The problem with this edition is that a rather literal and flat translation has been attempted that does not capture the beauty of the originals I still prefer the old school translators like AJ Arberry and RA Nicholson who changed the formal and independent distiches of a ghazal to better convey the thought in a series of rhymed uatrains Another option is to do a free style translation that makes it clear that each distich or couplet is unrelated to those that come before and after it