FREE READER é DOC The Children of Henry VIII ↠ 9780192840905 ✓ JOHN GUY

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FREE READER é DOC The Children of Henry VIII ↠ 9780192840905 ✓ JOHN GUY ë ❴PDF❵ ✪ The Children of Henry VIII Author John Guy – Gym-apparel.co.uk Behind the facade of politics and pageantry at the Tudor court there was a family dramaNothing drove Henry VIIIA different mother Their interrelationships were often scarred by jealously mutual distrust sibling rivalry even hatred Possessed of uick wits and strong wills their characters were defined partly by the educations they received and partly by events over which they had no controlHenry Fitzroy Duke of Richmond although recognized as the king's son could never forget his illegitimacy Edward died while still in his teens desperately plotting to exclude his half sisters from the throne Mary's world was shattered by her I know it's not fair to give this 1 star but this was the most dry and boring story I have ever listened to I had history professors that could teach history with enthusiasm and better ways of teaching history I needed a story about a king for a challenge and thought I would read up on King Henry VIII and his children It sounded better than learning about his wives I learned that King Henry really wanted a son so he could pass on the throne to him and I learned that a lot of the babies he had never lived beyond 1 year old I also learned he started becoming a adulterer and cheating whenever he felt the urge He did bare children but most were illegitimate but he figured out loopholes to make them his heir to the throne I tried my hardest to remember names and the women and who gave birth to which child but the narrator of this book was AWFUL and most of the time put me to sleepI was such a history buff in high school and college and thought this would be fun to learn about There is another author's version of this and I might try it and see if it's better then this one MAYBE I'll try it

John Guy ì The Children of Henry VIII BOOK

Mother's divorce and her own unhappy marriage Elizabeth was the most successful but also the luckiest Even so she lived with the knowledge that her father had ordered her mother's execution was often in fear of her own life and could never marry the one man she truly lovedHenry's children idolized their father even if they differed radically over how to perpetuate his legacy To tell their stories John Guy returns to the archives drawing on a vast array of contemporary records personal letters and first hand accoun John Guy’s short but shocking The Children of Henry VIII delivers on its promise of a story ‘of jealousy envy and even hatred’ Yet the Tudor siblings seem kindly when compared to their fratricidal usurping antecedents the children of Richard Duke of York And that I think was their mistake They were horrid to each but not nearly horrid enough Henry VIII’s eldest child Mary Tudor in particular would have done well to have emulated such examples of Yorkist family feeling as Edward IV’s drowning his brother George Duke of Clarence in a vat of Malmsey wine and Richard III’s seizure of the Protectorship of Edward’s twelve year old heir who subseuently ‘disappeared’ in the Tower along with his little brotherFor the first three years of Mary Tudor’s life she was an only and beloved child Nevertheless her father judged that as a daughter she was unfit to inherit his crown John Guy believes that for a time Henry considered making Mary’s younger illegitimate half brother Henry Fitzroy his heir bestowing family titles of the boy and declaring he loved him ‘like his own soul’ Fitzroy died aged seventeen but Guy gives us a real sense of the boy who while Mary proved the perfect student would escape his lessons to hunt and shoot Fitzroy too was passed over however in Henry’s expectation that his second wife Anne Boleyn would bear a legitimate male heir When Anne bore Elizabeth in 1533 it was Mary who was the first to pay for Henry’s disappointment as he had her declared illegitimate to ensure she took second place to her little sister In some of Guy’s most vivid passages we see Mary aged almost eighteen obliged to live in the baby Elizabeth’s household raging against her humiliations refusing to share a horse litter with her sister and insisting in taking the best place when they travelled by barge Only when Anne Boleyn lost her head and Elizabeth too was declared a bastard did Mary learn to regard her sister with affection even praising Elizabeth to their father Family relations improved still further after Henry’s son Edward was born since everyone agreed he took precedence over his sisters John Guy gives wonderful details on the intimate friendship Mary later developed with her last step mother Katherine Parr But the family was torn apart once on Henry’s death With Edward VI aged only nine his maternal uncle seized power as the Protector Somerset Richard III had seized the Protectorship precisely in order to prevent such a power grab by his nephew’s non royal maternal relatives And watching what unfolded Mary might well have concluded that Richard had been right to do so Edward was to be raised in beliefs Henry had considered heretical while Protestant iconoclasts unleashed a period of cultural terrorism that puts the recent Islamist destruction of tombs and manuscripts in Timbuktu into the shade Mary fought to defend her father’s religious settlement arguing it could not be overturned during Edward’s minority But Edward was being encouraged to grow apart from his sisters When he died at the age of fifteen he excluded them from the throne on grounds of their illegitimacy complaining that Mary was a Catholic and that Elizabeth’s mother had been an adulterous treasonous slut John Guy suggests rightly I believe that although Edward left the throne to his cousin Jane Grey it was her husband the teenage Guildford Dudley whom Edward hoped would rule England The son of the Lord President of his Council and with no royal blood Guildford was a man from whom his subjects could expect ‘great things’ Edward argued Instead Mary I raised an army and took back her throne tried her rivals for treason and following a revolt cut off Guildford’s head and Jane’s also There was then just the problem of Elizabeth left to deal with and two possible means of Mary strengthening her position The first was to have a child so Elizabeth was no longer her heir But Mary’s pregnancy by Philip of Spain proved to be a phantom Philip left the country and declined to return for a further eighteen months Guy describes Mary as reduced haranguing Philip’s portrait before kicking it out of the room in her anger and frustration The second means was for Mary to have Elizabeth executed Guy outlines a series of Protestant plots to replace Mary with her sister Mary’s great grandfather Edward IV had had his brother Clarence drowned in that vat of Malmsey after a brief treason trial It might have been appropriate to have had Elizabeth strangled with one of the prim and plain dresses she wore to flaunt her pious Protestant opposition to Mary It was to be Philip Guy informs who helped save Elizabeth’s life Anxious to prevent the throne passing to Mary ueen of Scots who was to marry the French Dauphin Philip insisted his wife protect Elizabeth’s place as heir to the throne He would get his just deserts for this almost thirty years later when Elizabeth backed the Dutch revolt against Spain in the Netherlands and then sank his retaliatory Armada Meanwhile the bitterest moment for Mary came at her death in 1558 when she was obliged to confirm her hated sister as her heir in order to insure a peaceful transition of power Elizabeth showed little gratitude for her sister’s last personal sacrifice She wore Mary’s coronation mantle for her state entry into London the following year not in an act of sisterly solidarity or even to save a few pounds but rather Guy claims to dance on her sister’s grave John Guy is that rare cross over the scholar who also writes for the popular market It shows here as he sketches with verve and fluency the education and beliefs as well as briefly the reigns of these last Tudors But where he excels is in illuminating the coruscating relationships between the suabbling siblings They say if you’ve got lemons make lemonade and in Guy’s hands the story of The Children of Henry VIII is fresh sparkling and sharp 4 stars instead of five only because it cannot match in scope Guy's longer works A version of this Review first appeared under my name in the Literary Review in 2013

EBOOK ð The Children of Henry VIII ì John Guy

The Children of Henry VIIIBehind the facade of politics and pageantry at the Tudor court there was a family dramaNothing drove Henry VIII England's wealthiest and most powerful king than producing a legitimate male heir and so perpetuating his dynasty To that end he married six wives became the subject of the most notorious divorce case of the sixteenth century and broke with the pope all in an age of international competition and warfare social unrest and growing religious intolerance and discordHenry fathered four living children each by B 75% | More than Satisfactory Notes So list heavy that its titular characters are practically reduced to inventories of their gifts household staff and syllabi